Two prestigious national yearbook awards were awarded to the 2018 High School Yearbook staff in December by the American Scholastic Press Association.

Out of the thousands of high school yearbooks submitted last year to the American Scholastic Press Association for critique and judging, the All Saints High School 2018 Yearbook, The Foundation, was named as one of the nine “Most Outstanding High School Yearbooks” for the small school division and was also awarded the First Place Award from a points system regardless of school size.  All Saints is the only local school to receive such distinguished awards from the American Scholastic Press Association (ASPA) in recent years.

“Your yearbook shows excellence in the fields of writing, photography and page design and contains elements/sections of a memorable yearbook that will be treasured for years to come,” an anonymous ASPA yearbook judge said.

The contest is scored on a points tally from five categories: content presentation, general page design, general photography, publication structure, and creativity for a grand total of 1,000 points.  All Saints scored 880 points to earn the First Place classification, with the school’s highest scoring for their content presentation, general page design, and creativity.

“I’m so excited we won first place,”  editor Abby Schlehuber said.  “The staff and I worked so hard to produce that book and work toward our deadlines.  We did it and it paid off!  Let’s hope for another award this year!”

The editors were 2018 seniors Ally Muzyka, Kate Borthwick, and Taylor Renfroe; and 2018 sophomores Ellyn Brashear and Abby Schlehuber.  Staff members were 2018 seniors Austin Hickle, Whitney Lawson, and Nick Crews; 2018 sophomores Elise Headrick and Gage Clary; and 2018 freshmen Paige Schlehuber, Britton Stoffregen, and Tyler Yannone.  Shelly Smith is the adviser.  Balfour Publishing printed the yearbook. Jerry Clark is the school’s Balfour representative.

Using the theme “Friends” throughout the book, last year’s staff created a yearbook full of photos and stories illustrating the 2017-2018 school year.  Their coverage included student life in and out of school, athletics, academics, portraits, and advertising.  The students created their theme to be implemented throughout the book, designed their pages using desktop publishing, took and edited their own photos, and wrote their headlines, stories, and photo captions to produce their yearbook. In addition, they sold advertising to pay for publishing. The hard cover book is 160 pages with an additional 16 page supplement containing activities that occurred after the April 1 publishing deadline.

“We worked so hard and are so happy with the results,” editor Ellyn Brashear said. “I can’t wait for another great book this year.  We are so thankful for our staff and know that they are going to do an even better job for this one!”

The 2019 high school yearbook staff is led by juniors Ellyn Brashear and Abby Schlehuber as editors, with section editors junior Elise Headrick and sophomores Paige Schlehuber and Britton Stoffregen. Juniors Anna Cannon, Garrett Matthews and Hayley Latta along with sophomore Jackie DeClerk, and freshmen Ella Aycock, Jilayne Headrick, and Reagan Hunter complete the staff. The 2019 yearbook will be distributed in May, with the supplement being mailed to students in June.  The yearbook will be submitted for judging once again to ASPA before the July 1 deadline.

ASPA hosts the annual contest for scholastic yearbooks, magazines and newspapers, which includes entries from schools of all sizes in the U.S. and Canada. In addition to the awards, ASPA provides a review with advice on page design, story layout, graphics, headlining, cover design, advertising placement, and photography, among other items.

All Saints received the ASPA “Best First Year Yearbook” award in 2013 and First Place Awards in 2014, 2015, and 2016. In 2017,  the school earned Third Place recognition.

“Producing a high school yearbook is the ultimate Project Based Learning activity,” yearbook adviser Shelly Smith said.  “It is so fun to watch the students turn the tools they learned in class into a tangible product they can proudly hold and share with others for decades. Being recognized nationally for their achievements is evidence of  the skills they have learned and will use for the rest of their lives. I am so proud of these students!”